Man on E-Scooter knocks down 11 year-old girl! E-Scooters an unnecessary evil?

Photo Credit: Facebook/ Zam Riffzam

On 11 April, 11 year-old Ardini Nabila was walking along Pasir Ris Drive 1, on her way home from tuition.

Little did she know that she would be spending the next week home recuperating from a misaligned jaw, a tear in her gums, and abrasions to several parts of her body.

A 24 year-old man slammed in Ardini from the back, and caused her grievous bodily harm.

It was through the help of 5 kindly passers-by that Ardini’s father, Mr. Mr Rahmat Nizam Samat, and her mother were alerted to her condition.

Ardini was then admitted to KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital.

Photo Credit: Facebook/ Zam Riffzam

 

The police have since been notified of the incident and investigations are currently underway.

When asked about his daughter’s condition, Mr. Rahmat responded:

“My daughter’s examinations are coming up, but she has to miss school. She’s worried that she can’t catch up,” he said. “We also worry for her. Such an accident should not have happened.”

 

The incident also galvanised Pasir Ris-Punggol GRC MP Zainal Sapari on Friday to take to Facebook on his assessment of MOT’s evaluation of the Active Mobility Bill.

In his post, the member of parliament wished for a speedy recovery for Ardini and added “I hope MOT will review its position again”. You can read the post in its entirety here.

 

Are E-Scooters dangerous?

 

One in a long string of cases, Ardini Nabila is not the first to fall victim to an errant E-Scooter rider. Nor will she be the last.

Just the evening before, on Thursday (April 12), a 6 year-old boy was knocked over by an E-Scooter rider and had to be taken to the hospital.

It is of note, that the rider has yet to be arrested.

The ease of access, and relative convenience in terms of travel have resulted in a surge in the usage of these ubiquitous scooters.

But the lack of a proper regulatory body and the lack of a governing legislative authority on the issue of E-Scooters, has led to a culture of reckless and dangerous riding.

That as yet, E-Scooters do not need to be registered is of note as it only re-enforces the irresponsible nature of some of these errant riders who now cloak themselves with their anonymity.

Though E-Scooters will have to be registered from the second half of this year more can be done to police and regulate the utility of these gadgets, for safety of those who ride these scooters and those around them.

What do you think? Are E-Scooters a boon, or a bane? Let us know!